CONTACT

News

28 February 2024

Amazing Biology Presentation - Nourulhuda Mohammad

Amazing Biology Presentation - Nourulhuda Mohammad

"Ever heard of the endoplasmic reticulum? Yeah, it sounds kinda complex, but stick with me, and you'll see it's not as complicated as it seems. I found it’s actually super interesting when I prepared to present it in front of the class. In fact, understanding it opens doors to a whole world of biology! "

"The ER is like a cellular highway system, a network of tiny tubes floating in the cell's jelly-like substance (cytoplasm). In Arabic, it's called "الشَّبَكَة الإِنْدُوْبلَاْزْمِيَّة," which literally translates to the "endoplasmic network." and that’s exactly what it is! Cool, right? 

Now, this cellular highway does some pretty important stuff. It's like a factory, making and folding proteins in one part (that's the rough endoplasmic reticulum) and churning out lipids in the other part (the smooth endoplasmic reticulum). It's crucial for building cell structures (like the cell membrane as it’s mainly lipid) and even helps detoxify the body, which is especially important in organs like the liver.

But wait, there's more! The smooth endoplasmic reticulum stores calcium, which is essential for tons of biological functions, like muscle movement and memory. That means that your brain's storage system relies on this tiny cellular network. 

Now, here's the kicker: if something goes wrong in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can lead to trouble. I mean it’s not a huge worry though as it's got a built-in quality control system to catch any mistakes. But what happens if there’s an accumulation of misfolded proteins? Well, that can cause stress in the network, leading to diseases like liver issues, heart conditions, and even Alzheimer's. Scary stuff, but understanding it helps scientists find ways to fix it.

So, how do we tackle these problems? Well, one pharmaceutical approach is using inhibitors to target the enzymes around the endoplasmic reticulum, easing the stress and preventing diseases. 

Finally, here's a little tip from me – when it comes to giving presentations, don't be afraid to ask the students questions and most importantly be yourself. Improvising can be such a great tool for a good presentation which is why I didn’t memorise anything before I presented. I just relied on my explanation skills! (mind you English is not my first language). Sure, it can be nerve-wracking, but remember you are your own worst critic. I thought my presentation wasn’t that well-structured because I improvised so much but, look at me now – sharing my knowledge with all of you on the school website. Goes to show, you never know until you try!

Ever heard of the endoplasmic reticulum? Yeah, it sounds kinda complex, but stick with me, and you'll see it's not as complicated as it seems. I found it’s actually super interesting when I prepared to present it in front of the class. In fact, understanding it opens doors to a whole world of biology! 

The ER is like a cellular highway system, a network of tiny tubes floating in the cell's jelly-like substance (cytoplasm). In Arabic, it's called "الشَّبَكَة الإِنْدُوْبلَاْزْمِيَّة," which literally translates to the "endoplasmic network." and that’s exactly what it is! Cool, right? 

Now, this cellular highway does some pretty important stuff. It's like a factory, making and folding proteins in one part (that's the rough endoplasmic reticulum) and churning out lipids in the other part (the smooth endoplasmic reticulum). It's crucial for building cell structures (like the cell membrane as it’s mainly lipid) and even helps detoxify the body, which is especially important in organs like the liver.

But wait, there's more! The smooth endoplasmic reticulum stores calcium, which is essential for tons of biological functions, like muscle movement and memory. That means that your brain's storage system relies on this tiny cellular network. 

Now, here's the kicker: if something goes wrong in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can lead to trouble. I mean it’s not a huge worry though as it's got a built-in quality control system to catch any mistakes. But what happens if there’s an accumulation of misfolded proteins? Well, that can cause stress in the network, leading to diseases like liver issues, heart conditions, and even Alzheimer's. Scary stuff, but understanding it helps scientists find ways to fix it.

So, how do we tackle these problems? Well, one pharmaceutical approach is using inhibitors to target the enzymes around the endoplasmic reticulum, easing the stress and preventing diseases. 

Finally, here's a little tip from me – when it comes to giving presentations, don't be afraid to ask the students questions and most importantly be yourself. Improvising can be such a great tool for a good presentation which is why I didn’t memorise anything before I presented. I just relied on my explanation skills! (mind you English is not my first language). Sure, it can be nerve-wracking, but remember you are your own worst critic. I thought my presentation wasn’t that well-structured because I improvised so much but, look at me now – sharing my knowledge with all of you on the school website. Goes to show, you never know until you try!

Ever heard of the endoplasmic reticulum? Yeah, it sounds kinda complex, but stick with me, and you'll see it's not as complicated as it seems. I found it’s actually super interesting when I prepared to present it in front of the class. In fact, understanding it opens doors to a whole world of biology! 

The ER is like a cellular highway system, a network of tiny tubes floating in the cell's jelly-like substance (cytoplasm). In Arabic, it's called "الشَّبَكَة الإِنْدُوْبلَاْزْمِيَّة," which literally translates to the "endoplasmic network." and that’s exactly what it is! Cool, right? 

Now, this cellular highway does some pretty important stuff. It's like a factory, making and folding proteins in one part (that's the rough endoplasmic reticulum) and churning out lipids in the other part (the smooth endoplasmic reticulum). It's crucial for building cell structures (like the cell membrane as it’s mainly lipid) and even helps detoxify the body, which is especially important in organs like the liver.

But wait, there's more! The smooth endoplasmic reticulum stores calcium, which is essential for tons of biological functions, like muscle movement and memory. That means that your brain's storage system relies on this tiny cellular network. 

Now, here's the kicker: if something goes wrong in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can lead to trouble. I mean it’s not a huge worry though as it's got a built-in quality control system to catch any mistakes. But what happens if there’s an accumulation of misfolded proteins? Well, that can cause stress in the network, leading to diseases like liver issues, heart conditions, and even Alzheimer's. Scary stuff, but understanding it helps scientists find ways to fix it.

So, how do we tackle these problems? Well, one pharmaceutical approach is using inhibitors to target the enzymes around the endoplasmic reticulum, easing the stress and preventing diseases. 

Finally, here's a little tip from me – when it comes to giving presentations, don't be afraid to ask the students questions and most importantly be yourself. Improvising can be such a great tool for a good presentation which is why I didn’t memorise anything before I presented. I just relied on my explanation skills! (mind you English is not my first language). Sure, it can be nerve-wracking, but remember you are your own worst critic. I thought my presentation wasn’t that well-structured because I improvised so much but, look at me now – sharing my knowledge with all of you on the school website. Goes to show, you never know until you try!

"Ever heard of the endoplasmic reticulum? Yeah, it sounds kinda complex, but stick with me, and you'll see it's not as complicated as it seems. I found it’s actually super interesting when I prepared to present it in front of the class. In fact, understanding it opens doors to a whole world of biology! 

The ER is like a cellular highway system, a network of tiny tubes floating in the cell's jelly-like substance (cytoplasm). In Arabic, it's called "الشَّبَكَة الإِنْدُوْبلَاْزْمِيَّة," which literally translates to the "endoplasmic network." and that’s exactly what it is! Cool, right? 

Now, this cellular highway does some pretty important stuff. It's like a factory, making and folding proteins in one part (that's the rough endoplasmic reticulum) and churning out lipids in the other part (the smooth endoplasmic reticulum). It's crucial for building cell structures (like the cell membrane as it’s mainly lipid) and even helps detoxify the body, which is especially important in organs like the liver.

But wait, there's more! The smooth endoplasmic reticulum stores calcium, which is essential for tons of biological functions, like muscle movement and memory. That means that your brain's storage system relies on this tiny cellular network. 

Now, here's the kicker: if something goes wrong in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can lead to trouble. I mean it’s not a huge worry though as it's got a built-in quality control system to catch any mistakes. But what happens if there’s an accumulation of misfolded proteins? Well, that can cause stress in the network, leading to diseases like liver issues, heart conditions, and even Alzheimer's. Scary stuff, but understanding it helps scientists find ways to fix it.

So, how do we tackle these problems? Well, one pharmaceutical approach is using inhibitors to target the enzymes around the endoplasmic reticulum, easing the stress and preventing diseases. 

Finally, here's a little tip from me – when it comes to giving presentations, don't be afraid to ask the students questions and most importantly be yourself. Improvising can be such a great tool for a good presentation which is why I didn’t memorise anything before I presented. I just relied on my explanation skills! (mind you English is not my first language). Sure, it can be nerve-wracking, but remember you are your own worst critic. I thought my presentation wasn’t that well-structured because I improvised so much but, look at me now – sharing my knowledge with all of you on the school website. Goes to show, you never know until you try!" 

By Nourulhuda Mohammad

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 

Blog News Teaching and Learning
  • 28

    Feb

    Amazing Biology Presentation - Nourulhuda Mohammad

    "Ever heard of the endoplasmic reticulum? Yeah, it sounds kinda complex, but stick with me, and you'll see it's not as complicated as it seems."

  • 26

    Feb

    Monday Briefing 26th February 2024 - Don't Stop

    During my marathon training it occurred to me later in the day that the passage which I had gone through during my run was a similar journey to many o...

  • 19

    Feb

    The Monday Briefing - American Life

    Prior to half term, I had the huge pleasure of taking six students over to Boston in the United States for a Model UN trip at the prestigious Massachu...

  • 05

    Feb

    Monday Briefing - Time Stood Still

    On Friday, we hit the 100 day warning. 100 days to go until the commencement of the Summer Exams Series. Three figures, in days, still seem like a lon...

  • 29

    Jan

    The Monday Briefing - Borderline

    This week has been quite an interesting one in terms of boundary testing on the part of students.

  • 22

    Jan

    The Monday Briefing - Frozen

    This week has featured several meetings, gatherings and get togethers, all based around one theme: the importance of community.

  • 15

    Jan

    The Monday Briefing: Sanctuary

    “Redundancies. Lack of funding. A pandemic. All have contributed to a huge rise in children missing from class.” So began an article i...

  • 08

    Jan

    The Monday Briefing: She's Not Me

    “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” Abraham Lincoln Back in 2019, when it b...

  • 14

    Dec

    Parth's Interview: Teaching Physics at EIC

    With a focus on personalised learning and tailored support, our programs empower students to overcome obstacles and reach their full potential. Parth ...

  • 11

    Dec

    The Monday Briefing: Future

    The last week of term at the College is always taken up with mock exams, ensuring that students are kept honest, right up until the very last possib...

  • 04

    Dec

    The Monday Briefing: Incredible

    In many ways, he encapsulates the incredible power of setting oneself challenging goals, seemingly beyond the realms of possibility, and striving, thr...

  • 01

    Dec

    Scholarship Competition: Roland's Interview

    “It was extremely quick and easy with my parents filling out a form online. I then came into the school a few weeks later and sat a quick test no long...