A Level

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Students aged 16 to 19 (Year 12 to 13) join the College for the internationally recognised A-Level qualification. The programme provides students with the necessary qualifications to gain access to top universities in the UK and abroad.

For international students who join us for the two year programme, a robust EFL programme will complement the subject learning to ensure students feel comfortable with the language and do not fall behind in their learning. We are also able to offer a pre‑sessional language course prior to starting the A-Level programme.

Subject specialisation

Most students will choose three or four subjects at A-Level over two years that have been specifically chosen to ensure they gain access to their choice of university upon successful completion of the programme. The teachers and personal tutors work closely with the students to ensure they stay motivated and work hard throughout their A-Level programme to secure the grades they need to reach their academic goals. They will help explore internship and training schemes that will complement the student’s learning and strengthen their university application.

One year intensive

At Ealing Independent College, we have successfully been helping students who have underachieved on their A-Level courses gain the results they need. The high level of commitment expected means that we recommend that no more than two or three subjects should be taken simultaneously. Due to the recent A-Level reform the intensive year will encompass the two year curriculum, and it is therefore only suitable for those who have previously sat the exams and wish to enhance their grades to join this one year programme.

18 month A Level

This is an option for international students who are unable to commence the A-Level programme in September. These courses run from January and conclude in June of the following year.

The curriculum for the first year of A-Level will be studied between January and June in the first year, whilst the second year curriculum will run from September to June. Additional lessons are arranged in the first six months to ensure that students ‘catch up’ so they can join students in their last year of A-Level the following September.

Click on the links below for A Level subject overview and details. 

Course Summary

A Level Fine Art

What exam board does the College do?

AQA A-level Fine Art 

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit the following:

Unit 1 Portfolio of Work (96 marks – 60%) There is no time limit. Non-exam assessment (NEA) set and marked by the centre and moderated by AQA during a visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

Unit 2 Externally Set Task Assessed (96 marks -40%) Preparatory period and 15 hours supervised time of A-level. Non-exam assessment (NEA) set by AQA, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA during a visit to the centre. Visits will normally take place in June.

What content is covered?

Students should be introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of fine art media, processes and techniques. They should be made aware of both traditional and new media. Students should explore the use of drawing for different purposes, using a variety of methods and media on a variety of scales. Students may use sketchbooks/workbooks/journals to underpin their work where appropriate. Students should explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design, from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This should be integral to the investigating and making processes. Students' responses to these examples must be shown through practical and critical activities that demonstrate their understanding of different styles, genres and traditions. Students should be aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented. They should be aware of the importance of process as well as product.

Areas of study Students are required to work in one or more area(s) of fine art, such as those listed below. They may explore overlapping areas and combinations of areas: drawing and painting, mixed-media, including collage and assemblage, sculpture, ceramics, installation, printmaking (relief, intaglio, screen processes and lithography), moving image and photography.

What skills do I need to study it?

Students will be expected to demonstrate skills, as defined in Overarching knowledge, understanding and skills, in the context of their chosen area(s) of fine art. In addition, students will be required to demonstrate skills in all of the following:  appreciation of different approaches to recording images, such as observation, analysis, expression and imagination, awareness of intended audience or purpose for their chosen area(s) of fine art, understanding of the conventions of figurative/representational and abstract/non-representational imagery or genres , appreciation of different ways of working, such as, using underpainting, glazing, wash and impasto; modelling, carving, casting, constructing, assembling and welding; etching, engraving, drypoint, mono printing, lino printing, screen printing, photo silkscreen and lithography, understanding of pictorial space, composition, rhythm, scale and structure, appreciation of colour, line, tone, texture, shape and form.

Students must show knowledge and understanding of: how ideas, feelings and meanings can be conveyed and interpreted in images and artefacts in the chosen area(s) of study within fine art, historical and contemporary developments and different styles and genres, how images and artefacts relate to social, environmental, cultural and/or ethical contexts, and to the time and place in which they were created, continuity and change in different styles, genres and traditions relevant to fine art, a working vocabulary and specialist terminology that is relevant to their chosen area(s) of fine art.

What could study in this subject lead to?

This subject is important for student who wish to follow an artistic/creative career.  The qualification enables students to advance to a more specialised area, such as Animation, Architecture, Advertising, Fashion Design, Fine Art, Graphic Design, Illustration, Special Effects for Cinema, Photography, 3D Product Design, Sculpture, Textiles and more.

What if I want to study only AS?

The specifications have been designed to enable AS and A-level qualifications to be co-taught, where appropriate. AS students have the option to progress onto the full A-level.

If students wish to study only AS, exams for Unit 2 take place in 10 hours rather than 15 hours.

Course Summary

A-level Biology

What exam board does the College do?

EDEXCEL Biology  (Two year course)
Specification: 9BN0

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit three exams that are assessed externally. These written assessments include a range of multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. All three written papers will also include questions that target mathematics at Level 2 or above:

Paper 1: The Natural Environment and Species Survival

Duration: 2 hours (100 marks).
Contribution: 1/3 of the overall mark for the course.

Paper 2: Energy, exercise and co-ordination
Duration: 2 hours (100 marks).
Contribution: 1/3 of the overall mark for the course.
Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry.

Duration: 2 hours (100 marks).

Contribution: 1/3 of the overall mark for the course.
This paper includes synoptic questions that draw on any of the topics in the specification as well as the core practicals studied throughout the course.

Note: Overall, a minimum of 20% of the marks across the three papers will be awarded for mathematics at Level 2 or above.

Science Practical Endorsement: In addition to the three written exams at the end of the course, the course offers a Science Practical Endorsement which is composed of 18 Core Practicals that are taught as part of the two year course. These are designed to allow students to learn a range of practical skills and apply key experimental techniques, thus developing both a conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods. As such they also constitute a key element within the Paper 3 exam.

What content is covered?

Paper 1 examines the following topics relating to the natural environment and species survival:

Paper 2 examines the following topics relating to Organic and Physical Chemistry:

Paper 3: All topics listed above including the core practicals completed during the course. 

What skills do I need to study it?

An enquiring and analytical mind combined with the desire to question beyond the syllabus requirements is fundamental to developing your conceptual and theoretical understanding of the course. Assessments require strong writing skills and a solid foundation in mathematics. This course is designed to be demanding and encourages deep learning and the development of higher-order skills. As such, the use of independent study is an essential component to further develop your theoretical understanding of the syllabus. Confidence and motivation to improve will allow your practical skills to flourish though use of the Core Practicals and subsequent attainment of the Science Practical Endorsement.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Biological Sciences, Medicine, Veterinary Science, Dentistry, Optometry, Law. 

What if I want to study only AS?

The course offers an AS level (specification: 8BI0) which is composed of two written exams that cover the core topics covered in the first year of the syllabus. These written assessments include a range of multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Both written papers will also include questions that target mathematics at Level 2 or above:

Paper 1: Lifestyle, Transport, Genes and Health
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks).
Contribution:  50% of the overall mark for the course.


Paper 2: Development, plants and the environment.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks).
Contribution:  50% of the overall mark for the course.

Science Practical Endorsement: In addition to the two written exams sat at the end of the academic year, the course includes a Science Practical Endorsement which is composed of 9 Core Practicals relating to the first year of the specification.

Course Summary

Business Studies

What exam board does the College do?

AQA -7132

How is the subject assessed?

A-level assessment consists of three two hour written exams taken at the end of the two year course. Each exam is 2 hours in length (100 marks) and will be worth a third of the A-level.

All three papers will draw on material from the whole course so essentially all papers are expected to be synoptic to some degree.

The papers will feature a range of question styles including multiple choice questions, short answer questions, essay questions, data response questions and case studies

What content is covered?

The course consists of 10 broad topics that cover all aspects of business issues. In the first year we cover An introduction to key business areas: marketing, operations, finance and human resource management. This includes a special focus on decision making – particularly how decisions made in one area can affect the rest of the business.

The second year is an investigation of the strategic decisions that all businesses have to make. The following is a list of all the areas that are covered over the two years:

What skills do I need to study it?

Students will need to possess a level of interest in the business world. They will need to have some grasp of basic mathematical skills such as calculations and interpreting formulas. Moreover, an analytical and enquiring mind is important to apply concepts and theories to real life business case studies.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Business Studies is a broad subject that can lead to many interesting careers. These include but are not limited to; own business entrepreneurship, business management, banking and finance, management consulting and accountancy.

What if I want to study only AS?

The AS exam is possible and this includes the students sitting two papers of 90 minutes each. 

Course Summary

A Level Chemistry

What exam board does the College do?

EDEXCEL Chemistry  (two year course)
Specification: 9CH0

How is the subject assessed?

 

Students are required to sit three exams that are assessed externally. These written assessments include a range of multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. All three written papers will also include questions that target mathematics at Level 2 or above:

Paper 1: Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry.
Duration: 1 hour 45 minutes (90 marks).
Contribution:  30% of the overall mark for the course.

Paper 2: Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry.
Duration: 1 hour 45 minutes (90 marks).
Contribution:  30% of the overall mark for the course.
 

Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry.

Duration: 2 hour 30 minutes (120 marks).
Contribution:  40% of the overall mark for the course.
This paper includes synoptic questions that draw on any of the topics in the specification as well as the core practicals studied throughout the course.

Note: Overall, a minimum of 20% of the marks across the three papers will be awarded for mathematics at Level 2 or above.

Science Practical Endorsement: In addition to the three written exams at the end of the course, the course offers a Science Practical Endorsement which is composed of 16 Core Practicals that are taught as part of the two year course. These are designed to allow students to learn a range of practical skills and apply key experimental techniques, thus developing both a conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods. As such they also constitute a key element within the Paper 3 exam.

What content is covered?

Paper 1 examines the following topics relating to Inorganic and Physical Chemistry:

Paper 2 examines the following topics relating to Organic and Physical Chemistry:

What skills do I need to study it?

An enquiring and analytical mind combined with the desire to question beyond the syllabus requirements is fundamental to developing your conceptual and theoretical understanding of the course. Assessments require strong writing skills and a solid foundation in mathematics (as outlined previously).  This course is designed to be demanding and encourages deep learning and the development of higher-order skills. As such, the use of independent study is an essential component to further develop your theoretical understanding of the syllabus. Confidence and motivation to improve will allow your practical skills to flourish though use of the Core Practicals and subsequent attainment of the Science Practical Endorsement.

What if I want to study only AS?

The course offers an AS level (specification: 8CH0) which is composed of two written exams that cover the core topics covered in the first year of the syllabus. These written assessments include a range of multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Both written papers will also include questions that target mathematics at Level 2 or above:

Paper 1: Core Inorganic and Physical Chemistry.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks).
Contribution:  50% of the overall mark for the course.

Paper 2: Core Organic and Physical Chemistry.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes (80 marks).
Contribution:  50% of the overall mark for the course.
 

Science Practical Endorsement: In addition to the two written exams sat at the end of the academic year, the course includes a Science Practical Endorsement which is composed of 8 Core Practicals relating to the first year of the specification.

AS Computer Science

Course Summary

Computing is concerned with the use and functioning of computers. It is designed to give students a rich understanding of the technology involved in computers, how hardware operates and how software is created. By the end of the course students develop a good understanding of programming, both in theory and in practice, as well as considerable understanding of all of the main functions of computer systems. It is an intellectually challenging course, but an ideal preparation for those students interested in studying computer science at university, or who are interested in a career as a programmer.

Content and Assessment

Unit 1 – F451

This unit provides 50% of the AS mark.
This unit covers the course theory, including topics such as the use of Binary, the representation of data within a computer, the function of commonly used hardware and the Design Life Cycle. This topic is designed to give students a good background knowledge of the technology that makes up a computer, including the way processors operate, how memory is used to store data and how networking and data communication is achieved.

This unit is assessed by a one and a half hour exam.

Unit 2 – F452

This unit provides 50% of the AS mark.
This units is primarily concerned with teaching students how to program. This involves introducing students to the programming language Pascal (which was designed as a teaching language) followed by Visual Basic. Students are set a number of programming tasks of increasing complexity, as well as being taught a framework for understanding the commands and structures found in most programming languages. The final exam presents students with questions which both test their knowledge of the subject, but also their ability to solve algorithm problems under time pressure.

This unit is assessed by a one and a half hour exam, usually sat in June.

Exam Board

OCR

Pass Rate 

A*-C = 50%

 

A2 Computer Science

Course Summary

Computing is concerned with the use and functioning of computers. The A2 year of this course builds progressively on the concepts established during the AS work – it involves working with more complex models for the functioning of computer systems, developing more complicated algorithms and understanding different techniques for solving computational problems. The coursework gives students an opportunity to work on a programmed system from start to finish, producing a substantial piece of work. As with AS computing this is an intellectually challenging course, but an ideal preparation for those students interested in studying computer science at university, or who are interested in a career as a programmer.

Content and Assessment

Unit 3 – F453

This unit provides 60% of the A2 mark.
This unit covers the course theory, including topics such as use of the functions of the Operating System, Databases, Floating Point Binary and the functions of a compiler. This topic is designed to broaden a student’s understanding of the functioning of a computer – both by giving a deeper analysis of the technology used within a desktop PC, but also in terms of examining new programming paradigms and their use in problem solving.

This unit is assessed by a one and a half hour exam.

Unit 4 – F454

This unit provides 40% of the A2 mark.
This unit is a coursework unit. It consists of creating a fully functional programmed system (using Visual Basic). The coursework contains the following sections:
Analysis – where students write about the client needs for the new system
Design – where students create designs for a final system
Implementation – where students demonstrate how their system was created
Algorithms – where students describe the functioning of the main algorithms within the system

Testing – where students demonstrate how they have tested their system
User Documentation – where students create a user guide for their system
Technical Documentation – where the students create a technical description of the system
Evaluation – where students write about the successes and limitations of their system

The final write up for this coursework is usually in the region of 100-200 pages.

The deadline for the completion of all coursework is the final day of the Spring term.

Exam Board
OCR

Course Summary

Economics

What exam board does the College do?

Edexcel

How is the subject assessed?

At the end of two years students sit three 2 hour papers.

Paper 1 Markets and Business Behaviour assesses students on the Microeconomics themes in the course (Themes 1 & 3). Paper 2 The National and Global Economy assesses student on the Macroeconomics themes in the course (Themes 2 & 4).

Papers 1 and 2 are both worth 35% of the A-Level. Each paper has 100 marks and is divided into three sections. Section A (25 marks) is made up of multiple choice and short answer questions. Section B (50 marks) is made up of data response questions. Section C has a choice of two 25 marks questions.

Paper 3 Microeconomics and Macroeconomics assesses students on all four themes. Students are required to apply their knowledge and understanding, make connections and transfer higher-order skills across all four themes. It is worth 30% of the A-Level. It has 100 marks and is divided into two sections each with data response questions and a choice of 25 mark essay question.

What content is covered?

Theme 1 Introduction to Markets and Market Failure:

This theme focuses on microeconomic concepts. Students will develop an understanding of:

● nature of economics

● how markets work

● market failure

● government intervention.

Theme 2 The UK economy – Performance and Policies:

This theme focuses on macroeconomic concepts. Students will develop an understanding of:

● measures of economic performance

● aggregate demand

● aggregate supply

● national income

● economic growth

● macroeconomic objectives and policy.

Theme 3 Business behaviour and the Labour Market:

This theme develops the microeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 1 and focuses on business economics. Students will develop an understanding of:

● business growth

● business objectives

● revenues, costs and profits

● market structures

● labour market

● government intervention.

Theme 4 A Global Perspective:

This theme develops the macroeconomic concepts introduced in Theme 2 and applies these concepts in a global context. Students will develop an understanding of:

● international economics

● poverty and inequality

● emerging and developing economies

● the financial sector

● role of the state in the macroeconomy. 

 

What skills do I need to study it?

Students will need some basic mathematical skills and the ability to identify trends in data for short quantitative skills questions. They will need a good analytical mind to understand the range of models and concepts used in Economics. They should be comfortable using diagrams and writing about them, and have good writing skills to build chains of reasoning in essay questions. Following Economics stories in the news will also be useful for a number of topics in the course as students will soon realise how economic concepts and ideas affect our everyday lives as well as major aspects of government policy.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Economics is a strong subject to have for a range of social science, mathematical, business, and humanities degrees which can lead into careers in business, law, accounting, journalism, the civil service, and banking and finance.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is possible by taking the AS-Level exams in Economics. This consists of two 1 hour 30 minute papers with Paper 1 covering Theme 1 and Paper 2 covering Theme 2. 

Course Summary

English Literature

What exam board does the College do?

Edexcel A Level (9ET0)

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit three exams, Component 1 –Drama 60 marks) in a two and a quarter hour exam, and Component 2 - Prose ( worth 40 marks), a one hour exam, Component 3 -  Poetry (worth 60 marks) a two and a quarter hour exam.  Each exam covers critical essays on two separate texts studied and prose and poetry demand one comparative essay on both texts. The poetry unit includes an unseen element. Students also submit a 2,500 -3,000 word essay as course work worth 60 marks.

What content is covered?

Component 1 study of one Shakespeare play and one other drama from either tragedy or comedy.

We choose to study Othello and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. Students’ study is supported by Shakespeare – A Critical Anthology – Tragedy.

Component 2 Two prose texts on a similar theme whereby at least one must be pre-1900. Science and Society’

Studying Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Never Let Me Go  by Kazuo Ishiguro. Critical essays will explore the techniques employed by the authors in their narrative. Contextual considerations are autobiographical, literary, historical, religious, cultural and particularly the impact of science on society and the human condition.

Component 3 Poetry

Students study Post 2,000 specified poetry from Poems of the Decade, An Anthology of the Forward Books of Poetry 2002 – 2011. There are 22 poems covering a range of subjects: love, loss, war, relationships, feminism, death, decay and modern life.  The other Tet is The Movement Poet the Less Deceived by Philip Larkin an anthology of 28 poems, the poet’s first collection. The post 2,000 study will require a critical comparative essay with an unseen poem and The Movement collection requires a critical essay on one named poem and another of the candidate’s own choice for comparison.  Responding to effects of language is the most important AO.

Non-Examined Assessment:

An extended essay of up to 3.000 words which analyses at least two works of American Literature,  A Streetcar Named Desire  by Tennessee Williams and Truman Capote’s.  Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Students choose their ow topic form a range of themes such as re-invention, escape from the past, survival,, betrayal, tragic heroines .As well as contextual influences, students must make reference to the independent critical material  they have researched, throughout the essay.

What skills do I need to study it?

A passion for reading is paramount as students are required to read widely around the texts. Impeccable grammar and the ability to identify and analyse its effects; strong writing skills and fervour for analysing texts in context.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Studying this subject is important if students are considering university degrees which will then lead onto careers in law, journalism, education or publishing or the media.  It will provide a range of transferrable skills and enhance independent study skills and improve ability the quality of written responses for all subjects.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is certainly possible, through Edexcel AS English Literature (8ETO).

Topics would be identical for the prose unit; only one play would be studied for the Drama Component and only the post 2000 Anthology for the Poetry Component where the examination would require a comparison of two of the studied poems. There is no coursework for the AS syllabus.  

Course Summary

French A levels New Specification Level 3 Advanced GCE (9FR0)

What exam board does the College do?

Edexcel 

How is the subject assessed?

The Level 3 Advanced GCE exam in French consist of two externallyexamined papers assessing listening, reading and writing and a nonexamined speaking assessment. The speaking assessment is externally set and conducted by the subject teacher or an external examiner. All assessments are marked by Pearson.

Paper 1: 2 hours/ 40% of the qualification/80 marks

Paper 2: 2 hours 40 minutes/ 30% of the qualification/120 marks

Paper 3: 21-23 minutes/ 30% of the qualification/72 marks

Students must complete their speaking assessment in April/May 2019, all other assessments in May/June 2019

What content is covered?

Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Translation and Paper 3 Speaking both draw on vocabulary and structures across all four themes which are based on the French speaking society and culture of the language and address a range of social issues and trends, as well as aspects of the political and artistic culture of French speaking countries:

1) Les changements dans les structure familiales

2) La culture politique et artistique dans les pays francophones

3 )L’immigration et la societe multiculturelle francaise

4) L’Occupation et la Resistance

Paper 2 Written Response to Works and Translation draws on the study of two discrete French works (either two literary texts or one literary text and one film, including two research-based essays on their chosen literary works and a translation exercise.) 

What skills do I need to study it?

Students should show a developed control of the language system to convey meaning. They should be able to understand gist and main points from spoken and written material. They should be able to summarise information from spoken sources, reporting key points and subject matter. Students should show a certain capacity for critical an analytical thinking on the basis of their knowledge and understanding of French speaking cultures and societies.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Languages are becoming increasingly important in today’s society. Learning a language enhances the students’ opportunities to travel abroad or to study at a university abroad. It also broadens your horizons by giving deeper insight into other cultures and would ultimately increase your employability in the global market place.

What if I want to study only AS?

There is the possibility of a stand-alone AS exam but this is not recommended by the college and the awarding body. However, AS and A level qualification are co-teachable which means that our college can deliver Theme 1 and Theme 2 and one literary text or film in the first year, allowing students to be entered for the AS Level at the end of the academic year 2018. 

 At A-level we are currently experiencing a transition to the new A-level Mathematics. This will begin in September 2017 and continue until Summer 2019. We currently study the Edexcel exam board for both new and legacy qualifications.

2017/18 entry

Year 12: Most AS students will study the new AS and A-level Mathematics qualification. This involves sitting all exams at the end of the two year program. This comprises of pure content alongside statistics and mechanics. Some students who are resitting AS may choose to sit the old ‘legacy’ C1, C2 and S1/M1 exams.

Year 13: All students will study the legacy A-level qualification and sit C3, C4 and either M1 or S1 exams in the summer.

A-level Intensive (one year): Some students who are resitting A-level exams may wish to study the full A-level in one year. This covers C1-4 and M1 and S1. If students wish to study Further Mathematics in year 13 they should choose A-level Intensive in year 12.

Further Mathematics: Students who have completed A-level Mathematics may wish to study Further Mathematics. This comprises of 12 periods per week. We currently study FP1-3, D1, M2 and S2. Students who wish to study Further Mathematics should choose the one-year A-level Intensive in year 12.

2018/19 entry

Year 12: All AS students will study the new AS and A-level Mathematics qualification. This involves sitting all exams at the end of the two-year program. This comprises of pure content alongside statistics and mechanics.

Year 13: Most students will study the new A-level Mathematics, sitting all their exams at the end of the two-year program. Some students who are resitting may choose to sit ‘legacy’ C3, C4 and S1/M1. This is only available to students who are resitting.

A-level Intensive (for Further Maths):  Year 12 students who wish to study Further Mathematics in their second year may choose to study the 1-year A-level intensive in year 12. This follows the new A-level syllabus with a Pure 1, Pure 2 and combined Statistics/Mechanics (SM) exam at the end of the course.

A-level Intensive (resit):  Students who are resitting A-level may wish to study all six modules intensively over the year. This consists of C1-4, M1 and S1. As this is a legacy qualification it is only open to students who are resitting. Some students may wish to study as a Year 13 class which will only cover C3 and C4, alongside M1 and S1.

Further Mathematics: Students who have completed A-level Mathematics may wish to study Further Mathematics. This comprises of 12 periods per week and follows the new specification. This will comprise of four modules, including two pure modules and two option modules that may cover a combination of further pure or mechanics, statistics, or decision mathematics.

Legacy A-level Mathematics

The legacy A-level (final exams summer 2018 for first sit or summer 2019 for resit) comprises of six modules: C1, C2, C3, C4 which cover pure content and M1 and S1 which cover mechanics and statistics. These exams are 1h30 in length and 75 marks each. Three exams are needed for AS level and six exams for A-level.

New A-level Mathematics

The new A-level comprises of three exams. Two papers – Pure 1 and Pure 2 – consist of pure content and one paper – SM – consists of combined mechanics and statistics content. All papers are two hours in duration and 100 marks each. All three exams are sat at the end of the two-year program.

Students who only wish to study AS Mathematics sit two papers – Pure 1 and SM (Statistics/Mechanics) – although these are different to the papers of the same name at A-level and cover roughly half the content of the A-level papers. The AS Pure 1 paper is 2 hours in duration and 100 marks and the SM paper is 1h15 and 60 marks.

Legacy A-level Further Mathematics

The current A-level Further Mathematics consists of six modules. We currently study three modules of pure – FP1, FP2 and FP3 – alongside three applied modules. Normally our applied modules are D1, S2 and M2 which cover Decision, further Statistics, and further Mechanics, but these can vary based on student need. All six exams are sat in the summer and carry 75 marks each and are 1h30 in duration.

New A-level Further Mathematics

The new A-level Further Mathematics consists of only four modules. This means it covers less content than the current further mathematics but modules are studied in slightly more depth and examined at a higher level. Two of these cover compulsory pure content – Further Pure 1 and Further Pure 2 which are slightly more challenging than the current equivalent modules. Two additional modules feature optional content and likely options include Further Pure 3, Further Pure 4, Further Mechanics 1, Further Statistics 1, and Decision 1. The modules chosen in each year are dependent on student interest and may vary. All four papers are 75 marks each and 1 hour 30 in duration. If you have any questions please get in touch with us.  

How and when is A-level mathematics changing?

The new A-level Mathematics begins teaching in September 2017 for first AS exams in summer 2018 and first A-level exams in summer 2019.

What changes are happening and when? 

In 2017/18 students who are resitting AS may choose to sit the old legacy AS exams (C1, C2, M1, S1) but they should only do this if they do not plan to continue onto A2 mathematics as they will not be able to sit C3 and C4 in 2018/19 unless they are resitting those modules.

In 2018/19 most students will be studying new specifications unless they are resitting their qualification, in which case they may choose to sit legacy exams.

In 2019/20 all students will be studying the new linear A-level specification.

Students who begin A-level qualifications in September 2017 who wish to study Further Mathematics in their second year will study the old modular specification A-level Mathematics in summer 2018 and the new linear specification A-level Further Mathematics in summer 2019.

The New AS and A-level Mathematics

The new AS and A-level mathematics will be a linear program. This means most students, who plan to continue onto A-level mathematics, will sit all their exams at the end of their second year of study. Students who perform poorly in their mock exams at the end of year 1 or who do not wish to continue onto A-level may choose to sit AS exams at the end of year 1 instead.

AS Mathematics exams consists of two exams: Pure 1 (2 hours, 100 marks) and a combined Statistics/Mechanics paper (1 hour 15, 60 marks). Both exams cover roughly half the content of the full A-level.

A-level Mathematics exams consist of three exams: Pure 1 (2 hours, 100 marks), Pure 2 (2 hours, 100 marks) and a combined Statistics/Mechanics paper (2 hours, 100 marks). Despite the sharing the same names, these are different in both content and difficulty to the AS exams.

Pure 1 and Pure 2 cover the same content at A-level. This includes, proof by deduction, proof by exhaustion, proof by counter example, index laws, surds, quadratic functions, simultaneous equations, linear and quadratic inequalities, polynomials, factor theorem, remainder theorem, graphs of functions, functions and composite functions, transformations of graphs, coordinate geometry, the equation of a circle, arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, binomial expansion, trigonometry, sectors, trigonometric equations, trigonometric identities, double angle formulae, exponentials and logarithms, differentiation and integration, numerical methods and vectors.

SM (Statistics/Mechanics) covers sampling, representation of data, probability, Normal distribution, Binomial distribution, hypothesis testing, kinematics, forces and Newton’s law and moments.

The new A-level features similar content to the current A-level but exams feature content that is aimed at testing more problem-solving skills and contextualised problems.

The New AS and A-level Further Mathematics

The new A-level Further Mathematics consists of four modules. Two of these are compulsory: Further Pure 1 and Further Pure 2. Both are 1 hour 30 in duration and 75 marks each. Further Pure 1 and 2 covers proof, complex numbers, matrices and further algebra and functions, further calculus and further vectors as well as polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions and differential equations. 

Two modules are optional and these include (all 1 hour 30 and 75 marks):

Although all new modules cover similar content to the legacy Further Mathematics, which consists of six modules, many of these modules cover slightly more content than their legacy counterpart and are examined at a slightly higher level which contains more ‘problem-solving’ content. As a result, the new Further Mathematics consists of only four modules. 

The modules chosen are likely to vary from year to year and are dependent on the preferences of the students studying Mathematics in any given year. 

Course Summary

A Level Geography

What exam board does the College do?

AQA (7037 new specification, first exams in 2018)

http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/geography/specifications/AQA-7037-SP-2016.PDF

What content is covered and how is the subject assessed?

 

In the new specifications, the subject is split into physical and human geography components:

Component 1: Physical geography

What's assessed

Section A: Water and carbon cycles

Section B: either Hot desert systems and landscapes or Coastal systems and landscapes or Glacial systems and landscapes

Section C: either Hazards or Ecosystems under stress

How it's assessed

• Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

• 120 marks

• 40% of A-level

Component 2: Human geography

What's assessed

Section A: Global systems and global governance

Section B: Changing places

Section C: either Contemporary urban environments or Population and the environment or Resource security

How it's assessed

• Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

• 120 marks

• 40% of A-level

Component 3: Geography fieldwork investigation

What's assessed

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content.

How it's assessed

• 3,000–4,000 words

• 60 marks

• 20% of A-level

• marked by teachers

• moderated by AQA

What skills do I need to study it?

It is recommended that students taking on the A-Level Geography course have completed Geography at GCSE, as this would provide fundamental knowledge of key content and ideas. Alongside this it is important to have a broad way of thinking, considering geographical issues using the three pillar approach (economic, social, environmental), and at different scales with different players and stakeholders involved.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Geography opens up many doors for university study and ultimately careers, ranging from human to physical geography, including areas such as GIS and mapping to urban or transport planning to sustainability or development work.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is certainly possible. AS students would complete a shorter version of the course (following specification 7036).

http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/geography/specifications/AQA-7036-SP-2016.PDF

AS French/German/Spanish

Course Summary

The AS course comprises 2 units, taken in the first year. This course is designed to enable students to communicate confidently and clearly in the language, both through the spoken and written word. This modern course involves the study of contemporary language in writing and speech.

Students make notes on the topics and learn related vocabulary on an ongoing basis, building up a well-organised file, invaluable for revision and consolidation. They read and listen to the language on a daily basis. They also keep a log of exam-type questions for production skills, to develop and practise answers and regularly give presentations to develop confidence, skills and knowledge of societies and cultures.

Content and Assessment

Fr/01 – Sp/01 – Gr/01 Listening, Reading and Responding (June)
Fr/02 – Sp/02 – Gr/02 Oral presentation on chosen topic (April-May)

Regular assessment in the four skills of Speaking, Reading, Writing and Listening is built into the course. There isn’t a coursework component.

Various topics are studied in the first year in specific areas:
YCC= Youth culture and concerns LHF =Lifestyle: health/fitness
WAU = The world around us E&E= Education /employment.

They include:

 

Exam Board

Edexcel. Other boards are also compatible with the course with additional tuition.

Options

N/A

A2 French/German/Spanish

Course Summary

A2 students will build on the skills acquired during the AS course and will develop their powers of expression by extending their vocabulary and understanding of the structure of the target language. They will learn about the society and culture of the countries where the target language is spoken and have the opportunity to research topics of their own choice.
Students will make notes on the topics and learn topic-related vocabulary on an ongoing basis, building up a well-organised file, invaluable for exams revision and topic consolidation. They are expected to read and listen to the language on a daily basis. Students also keep a log of exam-type questions for production skills, to develop and practise answers as each different topic is studied. Building up the personal study log and regularly giving short oral presentations in class will develop confidence, skills and knowledge of societies and cultures.

Content and Assessment

Fr/03 – Sp/03 – Gr/03 Oral Debate (April-May)
Fr/04 – Sp/04 – Gr/04 Reading and Research (June)

Various topics are studied in specific areas:

YCC= Youth culture and concerns
LHF =Lifestyle: health/fitness
WAU = The world around us
E&E= Education /employment.

They include:

 

Exam Board

Edexcel

Options

N/A

Pass Rate

A* – B = 50 %

Course Summary

Government and Politics

What exam board does the College do?

Edexcel

How is the subject assessed?

At the end of two years students sit three 2 hour exams, each worth one third of the A-Level. Each exam assesses one of the three components of the A-Level that are detailed below. Each paper is worth 84 Marks with students required to answer a 30 mark essay question in the first section linked to sources and a 24 mark essay question in the second section.

What content is covered?

Component 1 UK Politics:

1. Political Participation, students will study: democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media.

2. Core Political Ideas, students will study: conservatism, liberalism, socialism.

Component 2 UK Government:

1. UK Government, students will study: the constitution, parliament, Prime Minister and executive, relationships between the branches.

2. Optional Political Ideas, students will study one idea from the following: anarchism, ecologism, feminism, multiculturalism, nationalism.

Component 3 Comparative Politics:

Students have the option of studying either US Politics or Global Politics.

For USA (3A), students will study: the US Constitution and federalism, US Congress, US presidency, US Supreme Court and civil rights, democracy and participation, comparative theories.

OR

For Global (3B) students will study: sovereignty and globalisation, global governance: political and economic, global governance: human rights and environmental, power and developments, regionalism and the European Union, comparative theories. 

 

What skills do I need to study it?

Willingness to follow news and current affairs is essential. Good reading and writing skills, and an analytical mind are also needed to succeed in Politics. 

What could study in this subject lead to?

Politics is a respectable subject for a range of social science and humanities degrees, which can lead to careers in Law, Journalism, Civil Service, Politics, as well as careers in banking and finance. It will provide a range of transferable skills and enhance independent study skills.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is possible by taking the AS-Level exams in Politics. This would consist of two 1 hour 45 minute papers that would assess the Political Participation and UK Government sections of Components 1 and 2. Those planning to study for the full A-Level would begin studying the ideologies in Components 1 and 2 during the summer term of the first year.

Course Summary

A Level History

What exam board does the College do?

AQA A-Level History B (7042)

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit two exams, Component 1 – the breadth study (worth 80 marks) in a two and a half hour exam, and Component 2 (also worth 80 marks), and also in a two and a half hour exam. Both exams feature one source based essay where three contemporary or historians’ sources based on interpretations are compared, and two further essays which focus mainly on change, continuity and significance. Students also submit a 3,500 word essay as part of their Non-Examined Assessment (worth 40 marks). 

What content is covered?

Component 1 focuses on Tsarist and Communist Russia 1855-1964 (1H):

From autocracy under Tsars Alexander II, Alexander III and Nicholas II, through the brief democratic time of the Provisional Government, and onto the authoritarian rule of the Bolsheviks under Lenin, Stalin and Khrushchev, this unit analysis themes such as the governance of Russia, opposition to it, economic and social development, as well as the use of oppression and the importance of ideology.

Component 2 is a study of Modern Britain from 1951-2007 (2S):

This option provides for the study in depth of the key political, economic, social and international changes which helped to mould Britain in the second half of the 20th century, from the time of Churchill, through MacMillan’s premiership, to Wilson, Thatcher and finally Blair. It explores concepts such as government and opposition, class, social division and cultural change. It encourages students to reflect on Britain’s changing place in the world as well as the interrelationship between political policies, economic developments and political survival.

Non-Examined Assessment:

An extended 3,500 word essay which analyses Antisemitism from 1804-1925, the time of Napoleon leadership of France to Hitler’s writing of Mein Kampf, exploring a range of themes, from economy to nationalism and the rise of evolutionary theory, along with the historiographical debate surrounding the topic. Students must make reference to the sources they use throughout the essay.

What skills do I need to study it?

An enquiring and analytical mind, a love of reading, strong writing skills and a desire to question the world around us are all vital to performing well at History. 

What could study in this subject lead to?

Studying this subject is important if students are considering university degrees which will then lead onto careers in law, journalism, education or banking. It will provide a range of transferrable skills and enhance independent study skills.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is certainly possible, through AQA AS-Level History (7041).

Topics would follow a similar path, but would only follow around half of the content of the full A-Level – Russia would only be studied up to 1917 and Britian to 1979 – and the examinations would be shorter, with only two questions, one of which being compulsory source based, in an hour and a half. There would be no Non-Examined Assessment for a student studying the subject only as far as AS.

Course Summary

A Level Philosophy

What exam board does the College do?

AQA A-Level Philosophy (2175)

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit two three hour examinations, the AS Examination – Epistemology and Philosophy of Religion (worth 80 marks) and the A2 Examination – Ethics and Philosophy of Mind (also worth 80 marks). Both exams feature an assortment of shorter (2, 5, or 9-mark) responses alongside a longer 15-mark essay.

What content is covered?

AS (1176):

Section A – Epistemology – focuses on theories of perception (including direct realism, indirect realism, and Berkeley’s idealism), the definition of knowledge (in particular, the tripartite view of propositional knowledge and Gettier-style challenges to it) and the nature and origins of concepts (including empiricism and rationalism).

Section B – Philosophy of Religion focuses on the concept of God (including the divine attributes of omniscience, omnipotence, supreme goodness, and eternality), arguments relating to the existence of God (in particular, ontological arguments, the argument from design, the cosmological argument, and the problem of evil) and religious language (including logical positivism, cognitivism, and non-cognitivism).

A2 (2176):

Section A – Ethics – focuses on ethical theories (including utilitarianism, Kantian deontological ethics, and Aristotle’s virtue ethics) and ethical language (in particular, cognitivism and non-cognitivism).

Section B – Philosophy of Mind – focuses on expositions of the mind-body problem (in particular, dualism, materialism, logical/analytical behaviourism, mind-brain type identity theory, and eliminative materialism) 

What skills do I need to study it?

Some ability to ask penetrating questions (What can we know? Can the existence of God be proved? How do we make moral decisions? Are my mind and body separate?), to analyse and evaluate the arguments of others and to present own arguments clearly and logically both orally and in writing would serve as a sound foundation for the study of philosophy. An ability to assimilate ideas of various philosophical schools of thought requires an ability and desire to read a wide selection of philosophical texts.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Jobs that demand the skills of thinking for yourself and being able to analyse and communicate ideas clearly and logically include, but are not limited to, the following: barrister, civil service fast streamer, health service manager, local government officer, marketing executive, newspaper journalist, psychotherapist, recruitment consultant, solicitor, stockbroker.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is certainly possible. AS (1176) can be taken as a standalone course. 

AS Physics

Course Summary

Physics deals with a fundamental understanding of how nature works. It incorporates an understanding in the behaviour of particles and waves through the language of mathematics to fully appreciate its true beauty.
This subject is useful if you wish to study Astronomy, Astrophysics, Physics, Particle Physics, Electricity, Electronics, Engineering (all types) Medical Physics, Physical Chemistry and more.

Content and Assessment

The A Level Physics comprises of 6 Units; 3 Units at AS Level and 3 Units at A2 Level

Unit 1 Physics on the go  (Unit Code 6PH01)

Makes up 40% of the AS Physics and counts towards 20% of the GCE
This unit involves the study of mechanics (rectilinear motion, forces, energy and power) and materials (flow of liquids, viscosity, Stokes’ Law, properties of materials, Young’s’ modulus and elastic strain energy). Part of this topic may be taught using applications that relate to, for example, sports. The other part of this topic may be taught using, for example, a case study of the production of sweets and biscuits. It may also be taught using the physics associated with spare part surgery for joint replacements and lens implants.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by means of a written examination paper of 1 hour 30 minutes duration, which will consist of objective questions, short questions and long questions.

Unit 2 Physics on the move (Unit Code 6PH02)

Makes up 40% of the AS Physics and counts towards 20% of the GCE
This unit involves the study of waves (including refraction, polarisation, diffraction and standing (stationary) waves), electricity (current and resistance, Ohm’s law and nonohmic materials, potential dividers, emf and internal resistance of cells, and negative temperature coefficient thermistors) and the wave/particle nature of light. Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including music, medical physics, technology in space, solar cells and an historical study of the nature of light.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by means of a written examination paper of 1 hour 30 minutes duration, which will consist of objective questions, short questions and long questions.

Unit 3 Exploring Physics  (Unit Code 6PH03)

Makes up 20% of the AS Physics and counts towards 10% of the GCE
This unit involves an experiment that is based on a physics-based visit or a case study of an application of physics.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by means of an experiment that is founded on either a physics based visit or a case study of an application of physics. Students write a report that is either internally marked and externally moderated or externally marked by Edexcel.

Exam Board

Edexcel

Pass Rate

A* – C = 17%

A2 Physics

Content and Assessment

Unit 4  Physics on the move (Unit Code 6PH04)

Makes up 40% of the A2 Physics and counts towards 20% of the GCE Physics

This unit involves the study of further mechanics (momentum and circular motion), electric and magnetic fields, and particle physics.
Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including a modern rail transport system, communications and display techniques.
Particle physics is the subject of current research, involving the acceleration and detection of high-energy particles. This area of the specification may be taught by exploring a range of contemporary experiments.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by means of a written examination paper of 1 hour 35 minutes duration, which will consist of objective questions, short questions and long questions.

Unit 5 Physics from creation to collapse (Unit Code 6PH05)

Makes up 40% of the A2 Physics and counts towards 20% of the GCE Physics

This unit involves the study of thermal energy, nuclear decay, oscillations, astrophysics and cosmology. Several different contexts may be used to teach parts of this unit including space technology, medical physics and the construction of buildings in earthquake zones. The astrophysics and cosmology section of this specification may be taught using the physical interpretation of astronomical observations, the formation and evolution of stars, and the history and future of the universe.

Assessment: This unit is assessed by means of a written examination paper of 1 hour 35 minutes duration, which will consist of objective questions, short questions and long questions.

Unit 6  Experimental Physics (Unit Code 6PH06)

Makes up 20% of the A2 Physics and counts towards 10% of the GCE Physics

This unit involves planning an experiment, carrying out an experiment and analysing experimental results.

Assessment: Students must plan an experiment and then carry out a plan of an experiment which may be their own plan, a plan provided by Edexcel or a plan devised by the centre. Students write a report that is either marked by the teacher and externally moderated or externally marked by Edexcel.

Exam Board

Edexcel

Pass Rate

A* – B = 50%

Course Summary

Psychology

What exam board does the College do?

AQA Syllabus 7182

How is the subject assessed?

Students are required to sit 3 exams. Each exam takes 2 hours and each is worth 96 marks. In paper one the Introduction to psychology paper there are 4 sections consisting of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing essays. Paper two consists of 3 sections again with multiple choice, short answer and extended essay questions. Paper 3 follows the same format with 4 sections again with multiple choice short answer and extended essay questions.

What content is covered?

Component One: Areas covered here are social influence, memory, attachment and abnormality. With social influence the reasons why people obey or conform, traits we see in everyday life are explored. With memory issues such as the accuracy of memory and in particular eye witness testimony are researched. Attachment in childhood is widely accepted as shaping our future personality; research on this is outlined in detail. The topic of abnormality is controversial, for example how is it defined and what causes it our biology or life circumstances? The relevant research on this is discussed

Component Two: Topics covered are the different approaches to examining human behaviour, this overlaps with the areas covered in component one, for example are our personalities shaped by forces in nature such as genetics  or biochemistry or are the role models we see and the personal choices the factors that shape us as people. The methods researchers have used to examine human nature are outlined in detail, these range from highly controlled experiments to long term surveys and detailed case studies. Each method gives us a unique view of human nature, students examine how appropriate each method is and the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Component Three: Again the main issues and debates regarding human nature are discussed, for example the issue of free will. To what extent are the choices we make really our own decisions? Students examine again how factors such as culture or early childhood can in fact limit our free will. Additional topics are relationships, stress and aggression. With relationships research in their formation and likely success is examined. With stress one issue is how much of it is caused by personality or life events. Why might some individuals cope with stress and others do not? With aggression everyday topics for instance research on how the media may promote aggressive behaviour and why it may influence some people more than others are examined.

What skills do I need to study it?

Ideally good essay writing skills, and basic mathematical skills. The most important skill however may be the desire to find out why people act as they do, combined with the desire not just to accept everyday reasons, but to look beyond them for the true causes of our behaviour.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Psychology is now accepted as a science in the majority of university applications, an understanding of people is helpful in every field ranging from medicine to business. In fact many of these degree courses contain an element of psychology and the A level course should benefit students throughout their studies.

What if I want to study only AS?

The AS course is a good introduction to the A level, in fact many of the options in component one are covered in the AS course. On completion of the AS course students are in an ideal position to  decide if they want to carry on with their studies at A2 or even degree level

Course Summary

Sociology

What exam board does the College do?

OCR A Level Sociology

How is the subject assessed?

Students sit three exams:

Paper 01 is 1 hour and 30 minutes and is worth 30% of the total A Level. Section A is a mix of short and medium tariff compulsory questions, some based on source material. Section B will be three questions that will test the quality of extended responses via a levels of response mark scheme from the Families and Relationships option.

Paper 02 is 2 hours and 15 minutes and is worth 35% of the total A Level. Students are required to answer a mix of short and medium tariff compulsory questions, some based on source material in section A. In Section B, there are two compulsory essay questions that will test the quality of extended responses via a levels of response mark scheme.

Paper 03 is 2 hours and 15 minutes and is worth 35% of the total A Level. For section A, students answer a mix of short and medium tariff compulsory questions, some based on source material. For Section B, there are three options; students answer three essay style questions on Crime and Deviance. 

What content is covered?

Paper 01 focuses on how individuals are socialised into their social identities. Students learn about a range of different identity sources as well as influences and understand the theoretical approaches to these. This is then developed through the context of Families and Relationships where students further develop their knowledge of both classical and contemporary sociological theory.

Paper 02 is a study of sociological research methods and social inequalities. The research process and methodologies are studied and strengths and weaknesses of each are assessed. Students then apply this knowledge to published sociological research. Understanding of social inequalities is developed through the core themes of social class, gender, ethnicity and age. Students research both the evidence for these and the theoretical explanations for why these social inequalities occur.

Paper 03 is about the contemporary research of globalisation and the digital social world. Students then learn about a wide range of criminological issues and debates. Trends in crime and how these are explained are examined and the practical applications of sociological research into solving crime are assessed.

What skills do I need to study it?

Students need to be interested in the world around them and be prepared to question established thinking. Students are encouraged to think about society from a range of perspectives and as such, a flexible and enquiring approach is needed. Strong essay writing skills are important and a desire to read and debate are important. 

What could study in this subject lead to?

Studying Sociology allows for students to gain a wide variety of transferable skills such as critical thinking, essay writing and appreciation of research methodology. Students who have studied this subject have gone into careers such as policing, journalism, HR, education and law.

What if I want to study only AS?

This is possible; students would follow the same topics as the full A Level course for Paper 01 and the majority of Paper 02. They would not study the content for Paper 03. The examination questions are shorter for the AS Level papers.

Course Summary

A Level Spanish

What exam board does the College do?

Edexcel Level 3  Advanced GCE Spanish (9SPO)

How is the subject assessed?

The Level 3 Advanced GCE Exam in Spanish consists of two externally-examined papers assessing listening, reading and writing and a non-examined speaking assessment:

Paper (9SPO/01) comprises Listening, Reading and Translation. This assessment is out of 80 marks and the total assessment time is 2 hours

Paper (9SPO/02) comprises  Written Response to Works and a Translation. This assessment is out of 120 marks and the total assessment time is 2 hours 40 minutes.

A 20-Minutes-Speaking Assessment consisting of two oral tasks. This assessment is out of 72 marks.

The first certification opportunity for this qualification will be 2018.

What content is covered?

 

 

Paper 1 (9SPO/01) is divided into 3 parts: Listening, Reading and Translation into English .

Paper 2 (9SPO/02) is divided into 2 parts: A written response to a research-based literary work (either two  literary  texts  studied or one literary  text and one film )that relate to the cultural and social context of Spanish speaking countries.

Both papers cover all 4 topic areas:

a) La evolucion de la sociedad espanola (la estructura familiar, el mundo laboral y el impacto turistico en Espana)

b) La cultura politica y artistica en el mundo de habla (la musica,los medios de comunicacion,los festivals y las tradiciones)

c) La inmigracion y la sociedad multicultural espanola (la inmigracion, la integracion, el racismo)

4) La dictatura franquista y la transicion a la democracia (el paso de la dictatura a la democracia)

Paper 3, the Speaking Exam, (9SPO/03) consists of 2 tasks: A discussion on a theme chosen out of a set of stimulus cards to assess reasoning techniques and support a statement or disagree (6-7 minutes, 5 minutes preparation time) and a presentation and discussion on the student’s independent research project(10-11 minutes, no preparation time)to assess questioning and presentation skills. The independent research project may be based on any of the 4 themes of study or on a subject of interest of the students choosing, but must relate to the cultural and social context of the language studied.

What skills do I need to study it?

Students will enhance their linguistic skills and promote and develop their capacity for critical thinking on the basis of their knowledge and understanding of the language, culture and society of the countries where Spanish is spoken.

They will develop control of the language system to convey meaning, using effective strategies to enhance and promote spoken and written skills, including an extended range of vocabulary,  for both practical and intellectual purposes.

What could study in this subject lead to?

Languages are becoming increasingly important in today’s society. Learning a language enhances the students’ opportunities to travel abroad or to study at a university abroad, it also broadens your horizons by giving deeper insight into other cultures and will ultimately increase your employability in the global market place.

What if I want to study only AS?

It is certainly possible to study towards the legacy qualification as a stand-alone AS exam. Taking the AS exam following the new Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE specification is not recommended by the Awarding Body. However, AS and A level qualifications are co-teachable, allowing students to be entered the AS at the end of the academic  year.

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